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Top 5 Toughest Roosters

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  • #61
    Originally posted by Insider View Post

    Malcolm bit off more than he could chew one night,Billy Todd was working the door at Souths and he refused to allow Reilly to enter. Reilly invited Todd over the road and copped a beating. Unfortunately for Malcolm he didn't know Billy was the Australian middleweight champ at the time.
    Tony Mundine was middle weight champ during the playing days of Malcolm Reilly who was skilful but a cheap short artist. I saw Bunny Reilly clean up the Pom on the SCG cricket pitch in a copy book tackle that resulted in Reilly leaving the field. I pay homage to Billy Todd the Aussie welterweight champ from the 50s for giving it to the Pom.

    Comment


    • #62
      Originally posted by Jacks Fur Coat View Post

      Hey mate...Neumann must have been as tough as that crazy pom Mal Reilly.

      You obviously seen him play? What were your recollections then .
      Louis began a South African rugby player. Due to apartheid and him being of mixed race, he couldn't represent his country. Instead South Africa also had a representative team of coloured stars, which he was part of. They would play the national team and other teams. Louis was spotted by a Leeds rugby league talent scout and they signed him to a contract. He would have been playing for Leeds in the early sixties and probably alongside Aussies like Ken Thornett. He was a second rower.

      He wanted to come to Australia at some stage and word had got around about his talent and toughness, something 60's Easts had little of. He joined in 1967, the same year that Jack Gibson took over the coaching. I first saw him play against Wests at Pratten Park. They had legendary tough guys like Noel Kelly, Peter Dimond, Dennis Meaney etc I was near the sidelines and I heard this thud from a body clash and one of West's tough guys hit the deck.

      I knew it was Neumann involved as I saw his arm and shoulder go in hard. They ended up taking the Wests guy off. From memory we won that game and neither Kelly or Dimond etc went anywhere near Neumann. His hit was legit. Louis wasn't a big guy. Similar to Ronnie Coote only a little more solid. I used to hang around training sessions at the SCG 2 back then and I saw his muscular build. Natural and rock hard. He quickly became the Roosters hard man in a minuscule pack that played well above their weight every week.

      He might have been around 27 or 28 when he arrived and was heading toward the end of his career but gave great service. Neumann was not like Mal Reilly, who was tough as teak too but a cheap shot merchant. Both were great ball players. Louis would just go about his business very discreetly, squaring up for team mates etc and I never saw anyone get over the top of him. The Roosters appointed him captain coach in 1969, with little success.

      Don Furner took over the club in 1970 and we finally got a decent front rower in big Jim Morgan from Souths. Neumann, who was getting on by then, drifted off into country league, where he remained active. He has well passed now. But I have found memories of his ball skills and hard hits in a time when we really have a marshmallow pack, with the exception of a young Bunny Reilly and a resolute Kevin Ashley.

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      • #63
        Hughie McGahn was my fav and one tough hombre, 3 others that havenít rated a mention( I dontthink)

        Chris Flannery, rupturing your ball sack and playing on then playing a Grand Final with a ruptured nut sack has my vote

        luke Phillips, endless tough performances putting his small frame on the line, the Broncos GF performance was epic

        Simon Bonetti, one tough old school no nonsense Hooker that put his body on the line every week
        Bringer of Rain, Embrace the Hate, Freedom for All

        Comment


        • #64
          Mark Harris

          Artie

          Hugh McGahan

          Morley

          JWH


          "Do you expect me to talk"? "No, Mr. Bond, I expect you to die".

          Comment


          • #65
            Jared number one for me.

            He has been the alpha male in our pack for this golden era.

            Comment


            • #66
              Originally posted by Louis N View Post

              Louis began a South African rugby player. Due to apartheid and him being of mixed race, he couldn't represent his country. Instead South Africa also had a representative team of coloured stars, which he was part of. They would play the national team and other teams. Louis was spotted by a Leeds rugby league talent scout and they signed him to a contract. He would have been playing for Leeds in the early sixties and probably alongside Aussies like Ken Thornett. He was a second rower.

              He wanted to come to Australia at some stage and word had got around about his talent and toughness, something 60's Easts had little of. He joined in 1967, the same year that Jack Gibson took over the coaching. I first saw him play against Wests at Pratten Park. They had legendary tough guys like Noel Kelly, Peter Dimond, Dennis Meaney etc I was near the sidelines and I heard this thud from a body clash and one of West's tough guys hit the deck.

              I knew it was Neumann involved as I saw his arm and shoulder go in hard. They ended up taking the Wests guy off. From memory we won that game and neither Kelly or Dimond etc went anywhere near Neumann. His hit was legit. Louis wasn't a big guy. Similar to Ronnie Coote only a little more solid. I used to hang around training sessions at the SCG 2 back then and I saw his muscular build. Natural and rock hard. He quickly became the Roosters hard man in a minuscule pack that played well above their weight every week.

              He might have been around 27 or 28 when he arrived and was heading toward the end of his career but gave great service. Neumann was not like Mal Reilly, who was tough as teak too but a cheap shot merchant. Both were great ball players. Louis would just go about his business very discreetly, squaring up for team mates etc and I never saw anyone get over the top of him. The Roosters appointed him captain coach in 1969, with little success.

              Don Furner took over the club in 1970 and we finally got a decent front rower in big Jim Morgan from Souths. Neumann, who was getting on by then, drifted off into country league, where he remained active. He has well passed now. But I have found memories of his ball skills and hard hits in a time when we really have a marshmallow pack, with the exception of a young Bunny Reilly and a resolute Kevin Ashley.
              Thanks Louis...what great memories.
              My friend keeps saying "Cheer up mate it could be worse. You could be stuck underground in a hole full of water". I know he means well.

              Comment


              • #67
                Originally posted by 007 View Post
                Mark Harris

                Artie

                Hugh McGahan

                Morley

                JWH

                So you need to be big to be tough?

                Comment


                • #68
                  Is a big man who takeís on another big man tough?
                  Is a big man who takes on a little man tough?
                  Is a little man who take on a bigger man tough?

                  Comment


                  • #69
                    My 5:

                    Hugh Mcgahan
                    Adrian Morley
                    Horrie Hastings
                    Jason Lowrie
                    Gavin Miller

                    Comment


                    • #70
                      Originally posted by Thirteen View Post
                      Is a big man who takeís on another big man tough?
                      Is a big man who takes on a little man tough?
                      Is a little man who take on a bigger man tough?
                      Is a little man who takes on a little man tough?

                      Comment


                      • #71
                        Originally posted by Mickie Lane View Post

                        Is a little man who takes on a little man tough?
                        It depends
                        I love porcelain hand dryers.

                        Comment


                        • #72
                          Originally posted by bondi paul View Post

                          Tony Mundine was middle weight champ during the playing days of Malcolm Reilly who was skilful but a cheap short artist. I saw Bunny Reilly clean up the Pom on the SCG cricket pitch in a copy book tackle that resulted in Reilly leaving the field. I pay homage to Billy Todd the Aussie welterweight champ from the 50s for giving it to the Pom.
                          Yeah wasn't sure if it was middleweight or welterweight,my father used to knock around a bit with Billy and he told me that story about 35 years ago so my memory wasn't crystal clear.

                          Comment


                          • #73
                            Originally posted by Insider View Post

                            Yeah wasn't sure if it was middleweight or welterweight,my father used to knock around a bit with Billy and he told me that story about 35 years ago so my memory wasn't crystal clear.
                            Up Easts.

                            Comment


                            • #74
                              Originally posted by Louis N View Post

                              Louis began a South African rugby player. Due to apartheid and him being of mixed race, he couldn't represent his country. Instead South Africa also had a representative team of coloured stars, which he was part of. They would play the national team and other teams. Louis was spotted by a Leeds rugby league talent scout and they signed him to a contract. He would have been playing for Leeds in the early sixties and probably alongside Aussies like Ken Thornett. He was a second rower.

                              He wanted to come to Australia at some stage and word had got around about his talent and toughness, something 60's Easts had little of. He joined in 1967, the same year that Jack Gibson took over the coaching. I first saw him play against Wests at Pratten Park. They had legendary tough guys like Noel Kelly, Peter Dimond, Dennis Meaney etc I was near the sidelines and I heard this thud from a body clash and one of West's tough guys hit the deck.

                              I knew it was Neumann involved as I saw his arm and shoulder go in hard. They ended up taking the Wests guy off. From memory we won that game and neither Kelly or Dimond etc went anywhere near Neumann. His hit was legit. Louis wasn't a big guy. Similar to Ronnie Coote only a little more solid. I used to hang around training sessions at the SCG 2 back then and I saw his muscular build. Natural and rock hard. He quickly became the Roosters hard man in a minuscule pack that played well above their weight every week.

                              He might have been around 27 or 28 when he arrived and was heading toward the end of his career but gave great service. Neumann was not like Mal Reilly, who was tough as teak too but a cheap shot merchant. Both were great ball players. Louis would just go about his business very discreetly, squaring up for team mates etc and I never saw anyone get over the top of him. The Roosters appointed him captain coach in 1969, with little success.

                              Don Furner took over the club in 1970 and we finally got a decent front rower in big Jim Morgan from Souths. Neumann, who was getting on by then, drifted off into country league, where he remained active. He has well passed now. But I have found memories of his ball skills and hard hits in a time when we really have a marshmallow pack, with the exception of a young Bunny Reilly and a resolute Kevin Ashley.
                              Nice one Louis. Nice to see you mention the head guard wearing 2nd rower and field goal exponent Kevin Ashley who never missed many. I recall when Jack left, Louis Neumann was capt coach in 69 the year when Brass signed,Louis was well liked by fellow players.

                              Comment


                              • #75
                                Originally posted by Louis N View Post

                                Louis began a South African rugby player. Due to apartheid and him being of mixed race, he couldn't represent his country. Instead South Africa also had a representative team of coloured stars, which he was part of. They would play the national team and other teams. Louis was spotted by a Leeds rugby league talent scout and they signed him to a contract. He would have been playing for Leeds in the early sixties and probably alongside Aussies like Ken Thornett. He was a second rower.

                                He wanted to come to Australia at some stage and word had got around about his talent and toughness, something 60's Easts had little of. He joined in 1967, the same year that Jack Gibson took over the coaching. I first saw him play against Wests at Pratten Park. They had legendary tough guys like Noel Kelly, Peter Dimond, Dennis Meaney etc I was near the sidelines and I heard this thud from a body clash and one of West's tough guys hit the deck.

                                I knew it was Neumann involved as I saw his arm and shoulder go in hard. They ended up taking the Wests guy off. From memory we won that game and neither Kelly or Dimond etc went anywhere near Neumann. His hit was legit. Louis wasn't a big guy. Similar to Ronnie Coote only a little more solid. I used to hang around training sessions at the SCG 2 back then and I saw his muscular build. Natural and rock hard. He quickly became the Roosters hard man in a minuscule pack that played well above their weight every week.

                                He might have been around 27 or 28 when he arrived and was heading toward the end of his career but gave great service. Neumann was not like Mal Reilly, who was tough as teak too but a cheap shot merchant. Both were great ball players. Louis would just go about his business very discreetly, squaring up for team mates etc and I never saw anyone get over the top of him. The Roosters appointed him captain coach in 1969, with little success.

                                Don Furner took over the club in 1970 and we finally got a decent front rower in big Jim Morgan from Souths. Neumann, who was getting on by then, drifted off into country league, where he remained active. He has well passed now. But I have found memories of his ball skills and hard hits in a time when we really have a marshmallow pack, with the exception of a young Bunny Reilly and a resolute Kevin Ashley.
                                Thats a good yarn Louis, thanks.

                                Comment

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